Plantain (Plantago lanceolata) 2oz/59ml Herbal Extract / Tincture - Maria Treben's Authentic™ Featured Herb

In stock
SKU
723175935860
$23.00

Of the many plants we know, this is one that has been as widespread and esteemed in ancient times as it is now. Since primeval times, it was the ruler of the ways and grew for the benefit of mankind. An Anglo Saxon source mentions Plantain "Weybroed" as one of the nine sacred herbs: "And you, Weybroed, mother of plants, open to the east mighty inside: Over you creak waggons, over you rode women, over you rode brides, over you snorted horses. You withstood all and offered resistance. So withstand too the venom and contagion and misfortune that sweep across the land." Today as then we need plants like Plantain which is so much esteemed in herbals. Its relative, the Common Plantain or Broad-leaved Plantain (Plantago major) is used in the same way. Both grow by roadsides, in ditches, meadows, moist wastelands and may be found all over the world.

 

DIRECTIONS:

 

Infusion: One heaped teaspoon of leaves to 1/4 litre of boiling water, infused for a short time.

 

Tea mixture: Equal proportions of Plantain and Thyme are mixed, 1 teaspoonful to 1/4 litre of boiling water (see above text).

 

Poultice: Fresh leaves of Ribwort or Common Plantain are washed and crushed on a wooden board with a wooden rolling pin and applied.

 

Syrup 1: Two heaped double handfuls of washed leaves are put through a mincer. To this add water so it does not burn, 300 gm. of raw sugar and 250 gm. of honey. Stir constantly on a low heat until this mixture is thick-flowing and bottle (keep in refrigerator).

 

Syrup 2: In a wide-mouthed jar or pot, alternate layers of Plantain with layers of raw sugar. Press down well, let it settle and add more layers until full. In a sheltered spot in the garden a hole is dug, into it is placed this jar, which is covered by 3 to 4 layers of parchment paper. A board is put over it and weighed down with a stone. Everything is covered with soil. Board and stone should still be visible. Through even heat of the soil, the sugar and the leaves ferment. After 3 months the jar is taken out and the juice is put through a fruit press (not a cloth), brought to the boil and bottled. If this kind of fermentation is not possible, the jar is left in the sun or in a warm place until the syrup sets on the bottom of the jar. This too is boiled once.

Of the many plants we know, this is one that has been as widespread and esteemed in ancient times as it is now. Since primeval times, it was the ruler of the ways and grew for the benefit of mankind. An Anglo Saxon source mentions Plantain "Weybroed" as one of the nine sacred herbs: "And you, Weybroed, mother of plants, open to the east mighty inside: Over you creak waggons, over you rode women, over you rode brides, over you snorted horses. You withstood all and offered resistance. So withstand too the venom and contagion and misfortune that sweep across the land." Today as then we need plants like Plantain which is so much esteemed in herbals. Its relative, the Common Plantain or Broad-leaved Plantain (Plantago major) is used in the same way. Both grow by roadsides, in ditches, meadows, moist wastelands and may be found all over the world.

Write Your Own Review
Only registered users can write reviews. Please Sign in or create an account